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Pirates on the Delaware

  Some Links that tell about pirates on the Delaware

"Pirates and Patriots: Tales of the Delaware Coast", by Michael Morgan

http://books.google.com/books?id=3JMTlP1Aw1gC&pg=PA14&lpg=PA14&dq=pirates+on+the+delaware&source=bl&ots=RlRJSg0QmP&sig=PjKAGlSNY3FWC0D1VhkAR8eguU4&hl=en&ei=o5caSsz1KZWstgenvcTuDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6 

or

http://tinyurl.com/p3erq5


"Delaware Diary: Pirates along the coast" by Michael Morgan

http://www.delmarvanow.com/article/20090507/DCP08/905070359/1058/DCP


Delaware Roots - History of Delaware, Chapter 10 - Pirates and Privateers - Thomas J. Scharf

http://www.delawareroots.org/index.php/history-of-delaware-j-thomas-scharf/118-chapter-10-pirates-and-privateers


http://www.delcohistory.org/ashmead/index.htm

History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania.
By
Henry Graham Ashmead

Philadelphia:
L. H. Everts & Co.
1884

History of Delaware County - Ashmead, Ch. XIX, (Page 181)

Chapter XIX

Manners And Customs

It would be told how Blackbeard, the pirate, used to anchor his vessel off Marcus Hook, where, at the house of a Swedish woman whose name,

Margaret, he transformed into Marcus, because of the locality of her dwelling, he and his crew held mad revels there, and the expression "Discord Lane"

became so connected with the town's story that it has ever since been preserved as the title of one of its streets.

History of Delaware County - Ashmead, Ch. XXXVIII, (Page 457-8)

  If tradition be accepted as authority, at the conclusion of the seventeenth and the first and second decades of the eighteenth century the pirates which then

infested the Atlantic coast from New England to Georgia would frequently stop at Marcus Hook, where they would revel, and when deep in their cups would indulge

in noisy disputation and broils, until one of the streets in that ancient borough from that fact was known as Discord Lane, which name the same thoroughfare has

retained for nearly two centuries. Blackbeard, who for many years kept the coast in alarm, with his crew it is said often visited Marcus Hook, where at the house of

a Swedish woman there, to whom he gave the title of Marcus, although her name was really Margaret, he was accustomed to indulge in the wildest disorder and

drunken debauches.1

1 Trench, or Drummond, let his family name be what it may, was as grotesquely conspicuous a villain as can be found in the annals of crime. Blackbeard, for that was his piratical name, in person tall,

of swarthy complexion, and with an exuberant black beard of extraordinary length covering his whole face, from which his sobriquet was derived, and which he used to twist into numberless small tails,

the ends tied with bows of brightly-colored ribbons, was a picture sufficiently repulsive, one would think, without calling in, as additional decoration when in battle, three braces of huge pistols dangling

across his shoulders, and lighted matches protruding from beneath his hat to illuminate his dusky face and savage eyes with a supernatural glare. His was, indeed, when prepared for action, a figure

to be gazed upon with fear and apprehension. Socially he was a sensual polygamist, whose harem of fourteen wives was the scene of brutalities such as even his hardened crew could not witness unmoved

with pity, and yet which no one dared to reprove. To reader his power over his lawless men absolute, he announced that he had entered into a compact with hell, and once, when at sea, a mysterious

personage appeared on the ship, sometimes aloft, sometimes on deck, sometimes below, who spoke to no one but Blackbeard, and who disappeared as secretly as he

had come among them. The crew firmly believed that this was the veritable devil himself, and that this was but one of many dark communications their chieftain held with the powers of evil. At another time when

afloat, it is recorded he said, maddened with drink, "Come, let us make a hell of our own, and try how long we can bear it." Going below with some of his crew, he caused the hatches to be closed, and had several

large tubs filled with sulphur and other combustible articles, to which he set fire; then while the thick choking vapors rolled in dense columns throughout the ship, he danced and filled the sickening air with his

profanity, until those above released the half-suffocated and fainting men from their perilous situation, which, apparently, gave the piratical chieftain no respiratory uneasiness. His convivial pleasantries were

also of a similar hideous character; for once when drunk, seated at the head of his cabin table, he blew out the candles, cocked his pistols, and crossing his hands fired on each side at his associates, one of

whom was wounded so desperately that he never recovered. This incident Blackbeard often himself related in gleeful moments, stating in conclusion, "If I did not now and then kill one of my men, they would

forget who I am." In the fall of the year 1718 the Governor of Virginia sent Lieut. Maynard with two vessels to cruise for Trench, and on the 21st of November he encountered the pirate, who, fortunately, then

had but a small crew on board his ship. A bloody fight resulted, - Maynard and Blackbeard contested hand to hand, - and it is related that the corsair received over twenty wounds with swords, and almost as

many bullets struck him, before he was slain. Maynard cut off the dreaded pirate's head and affixed it to the bowsprit of his vessel, and then he entered Hampton Roads with the ghastly, grinning token of his

success exposed to public view.

 

At the meeting of the Provincial Council in Philadelphia, Aug. 11, 1716, Governor William Keith called I the attention of Council to "the great losses which this colony has already sustained beyond any of its neighbors by our Trade being blocked up and infested with pirates at the Capes of this river and bay," and further informed them "that one Trench, a noted pirate, who has done the greatest mischief of any to this place has been lurking for some days in and about this town."2 We know that on Friday, Sept. 1, 1698, a pirate ship and tender landed fifty armed men and plundered Lewistown.3 In May, 1701, a French pirate appeared above Bombay Hook,4 and for many years thereafter the colonial records show the constant alarms the province was subjected to by fears of piratical demonstration on the settlements on the river.

If tradition be accepted as authority, at the conclusion of the seventeenth and the first and second decades of the eighteenth century the pirates which then infested the Atlantic coast from New England to Georgia would frequently stop at Marcus Hook, where they would revel, and when deep in their cups would indulge in noisy disputation and broils, until one of the streets in that ancient borough from that fact was known as Discord Lane, which name the same thoroughfare has retained for nearly two centuries. Blackbeard, who for many years kept the coast in alarm, with his crew it is said often visited Marcus Hook, where at the house of a Swedish woman there, to whom he gave the title of Marcus, although her name was really Margaret, he was accustomed to indulge in the wildest disorder and drunken debauches.1

Marcus Hook – A Market Town

In 1698, when Gabriel Thomas wrote his quaint "History of Pennsylvania," he specified, among the four great market towns, Chester as enjoying that privilege, and "likewise all those towns have fairs kept in them." It seems that Marcus Hook, shortly after this statement was made, desired to invest itself with the dignity of a market and fair, for at the Council at Philadelphia, May 16, 1699, at which Governor Markham presided, the minutes show:5

"Upon reading the petition of some of the Inhabitants of Chichester, in the Countie of Chester, Requesting a weeklie markett & two fairs in the year; After a full debate yrupon, the Leivt Gov & Council granted ym a weeklie market on friday's to be keept in broad street as is desired."

On Feb. 14, 1700, Penn having returned, and personally presiding over the deliberations of Council, on the minutes of that body under the date given is the further reference to Marcus Hook as a market town:6

2 Colonial Records, vol. iii. p. 54.

3 Ib., vol. i. p. 539.

4 Ib., vol. ii. p 21.

5 Ib., vol, i. p. 558.

6 Ib., vol. ii. p. 12.

 


 

 


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